New York Capital of Contemporary Art: Ten Galleries to See in Chelsea

 

Reprinted with permission of The Culture Trip.

 

With around 400 galleries in Chelsea alone, New York city is the gallery capital of the world. The cultural scene in this city is constantly flourishing, as galleries regularly introduce emerging talent and the most intriguing exhibitions to be found anywhere. As it can be truly difficult to navigate this web of cultural venues, what follows is a list of ten galleries to check out in the city’s most artistic district.

Matthew Marks Gallery

With two spaces in Los Angeles and four in New York – all located within a few blocks of each other – Matthew Marks Gallery holds a powerful presence within the Chelsea gallery scene. The playfully unexpected works of Peter Fischli and David Weiss, the appropriated iconography of Jasper Johns, the immense photographs of Thomas Demand and the profoundly intimate images of Nan Goldin are some of the significant works to be found here. Showing work in a range of different media, Matthew Marks Gallery holds around 15 exhibitions annually, and represents both European and American younger as well as more established artists.

 © Nan Golding and Matthew Marks Gallery

David Zwirner

David Zwirner Gallery opened in 1993 in SoHo, and moved to its Chelsea location in 2002. Having undergone an expansion project in 2006, the gallery now boasts 30,000 square feet of floor space, allowing for the presentation of multiple concurrent large scale exhibitions. Amongst the impressive list of artists are: On Kawara, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Francis Alÿs, and Yayoi Kusama. The gallery has also helped to launch the careers of some of today’s leading names such as Luc Tuymans and Neo Rauch. In 2012 David Zwirner opened its first European gallery in the Mayfair neighbourhood of London.

© 2013 Stephen Flavin/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; courtesy of David Zwirner, New York/London

 Luhring Augustine

Luhring Augustine aims to show an international mix of contemporary artists working within the disciplines of painting, drawing, sculpture, video and photography. Artists shown here have exhibited their work extensively in gallery, museum and art fair contexts. Among these are Zarina Hashmi, Glenn Ligon, Yasumasa Morimura and Pipilotti Rist. Dealing both in the primary and secondary markets, Luhring Augustine also specialises in works from 20th century masters like Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol and Pablo Picasso.

© Luhring Augustine and Glenn Ligon

Greene Naftali Gallery

Carol Green opened Greene Naftali in 1995 in what was, at the time, a largely industrial area. In the years since, the gallery has become notorious for its conceptual installations and performances. The space itself, set on the eighth floor of a West 26th street building, welcomes visitors with a long hallway that leads back to three large exhibition rooms and windows looking out onto the High Line. Artists who have recently held exhibition in the space include Gedi Sibony, William Leavitt, Gianni Colombo and Tony Conrad.


© Andrew Russeth/Flickr

Cheim & Read

Founded in 1997, Cheim & Read prides itself on its representation of distinguished international contemporary artists and its meticulous curatorial model. Through a respected reputation it has been host to important monographic exhibitions of artists such as Louise Bourgeois, Jannis Kounellis and Joan Mitchell. A summer 2013 group exhibition focuses on New York abstraction during the 1980s by artists born between 1939 and 1949. Featuring Louise Fishman, Bill Jensen, Jonathan Lasker and Pat Steir, the show removes these painters from stylistic categorisation, concentrating instead on their own individualistic abstraction.


© Cheim & Read

Gladstone Gallery

With artists like Thomas Hirshorn, Ugo Rondinone, Allora & Calzadilla, and Shirin Neshat, Gladstone Gallery has established itself as one of the most well respected New York art spaces. With two Chelsea addresses and a gallery in Brussels, exhibitions at Gladstone lean towards the conceptual, political, philosophical and the bold. The Gallery even produced four out of the five Cremaster films by renowned film artist Matthew Barney in the 1990s. The Cremaster Cycle are the films for which the artist is perhaps most famous.

© Gladstone Gallery

Zach Feuer Gallery

Zach Feuer are risk takers known for their daring exhibitions featuring a primarily younger generation of artists. The gallery’s namesake dealer opened his first Chelsea gallery in 2000 and has since developed a reputation for turning new talents into art world stars. Among these are Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg, Phoebe Washburn and Stuart Hawkins. One of the more unusual figures to be found here is Sister Corita Kent, a Los Angeles nun who passed away in 1986. Working mostly in silkscreen and serigraphy, Kent’s work gained notoriety during the 1960s and 1970s through the messages of peace and love that she sent through her prints.

© Zach Feuer Gallery and Corita Art Center

Tanya Bonakdar

Among other internationally exhibited artists, Tanya Bonakdar features the fragmented cityscapes of Martin Boyce, the architectonic sculptures of Sarah Sze and the large scale, elemental installations of Olafur Eliasson in its elegant Chelsea space. The gallery is also dedicated to helping younger artists establish themselves on the global stage. Tanya Bonakdar regularly participates in art fairs around the world such as Art Basel, Frieze Art Fair and the Armoury Show. Represented artist Sarah Sze is showing her work in the United States pavilion at the 2013 Venice Biennale.

© Tanya Bonakdar and Sarah Sze

Gagosian Gallery

Originally opened in Los Angeles in 1979, Gagosian Gallery now has spaces in New York, London, Rome, Paris, Athens, Hong Kong and Geneva. Exhibitions at Gagosian focus both on the promotion of new and cutting edge artists and the celebration of those figures who define art history of the 20th century. In New York the gallery has two premier exhibition spaces in the Chelsea District. With artists like Jean-Michel Baquiat, Roy Lichtenstein, Jeff Koons and Jenny Saville, Gagosian is one of the few commercial galleries able to put on museum quality exhibitions.

© NYU FC 2 | WikiCommons

Andrea Rosen Gallery

The Andrea Rosen Gallery is perhaps best known for its representation of late conceptual artist Felix Gonzales-Torres who died in 1996 at the age of 39. Turner Prize Winning German artist Wolfang Tillmans, legendary photographer Walker Evans and Constructivist painter and photographer László Moholy-Nagy are some of the more notable artists showing work here. For summer 2013 Andrea Rosen Gallery is exhibiting the work of Simon Fujiwara, a young artist who has gained renown throughout Europe and Asia. Fujiwara is recognised for his autobiographical installations which raise questions about individual character and sexuality through enigmatic narrative.

Courtesy of Andrea Rosen Gallery Photograph by Pierre Le Hors © Simon Fujiwara

By Ellen Von Wiegand
For more articles on New York art and culture; handpicked local galleries; local books, films, music and apps recommendations; local cultural events and tours; and a selection of restaurants and hotels – have a look at http://theculturetrip.com/north-america/usa/new-york/

Musica als Parcs 2013 in Barcelona

Currently being held is the annual Musica als Parcs 2013 (Music in the Parks 2013) in Barcelona. It comprises a free summer event organised by the Barcelona City Council whereby visitors and locals alike are treated to a series of outdoor music concerts in some of the most beautiful parks and gardens dotted across the Catalan capital.

Thus, up until the 30th of August 2013, music lovers will be able to enjoy a total of 49 classical and jazz performances in 27 of Barcelona’s various parks and green spaces. Similarly to the recently held Barcelona Hotel Terrace Week 2013, launched to make some of the Catalan capital’s most luxurious hotels more accessible to the general public, Musica als Parcs was originally created to bring good quality classic and jazz music closer to everyone who wanted to listen.

This 18th edition of Musica als Parcs will feature musical concerts by the Banda Municipal de Barcelona (the Municipal Band of Barcelona) and Maria Camahort i Lucy Driver, as well as the Quartet Altimira, the Vanguard Duo, and the Tangram Duo, who will be offering classical numbers. Alternatively, for those who prefer a spot of jazz, the Santi Colomer Quartet, the Lluc Casares Quartet, and the Rubén Fernández i Andreu Zaragoza Duet, amongst others, are lined up to perform.

In addition, some of the top parks and green spaces will feature in Musica als Parcs 2013, including lovely Parque de la Ciutadella, Turó  Park, Parque de Joan Miró, Parque de la Barceloneta, Central de Nou Barris, Parque de la Estación del Norte, Jardines de la Primavera and Parque de las Aguas Guinardó, etc.

With regards to the concerts timetable, all musical performances by the Banda Municipal will begin at 8pm whilst, all the Classic and Jazz concerts will kick off at 9pm. This is unless stated otherwise in the official Musica als Parcs 2013 programme. Each performance will also last approximately an hour. Finally, as these outdoor  summer concerts are very popular, it is recommended that you arrive a little earlier so you can grab a nice spot!

To conclude, Musica als Parcs 2013 in Barcelona is an ideal way of enjoying the pleasant summer weather in a beautiful setting. Enjoy!

Guest post by Maria Allen

Il Palio, Siena – and an apartment available for rent during August!

The Palio, taking place on July 2 and August 16 every year, is the most exciting and important event on the  Sienese calendar, and attracts visitors from all around the world.

The origins of the Palio date back to medieval times, when Siena’s central square, the Piazza del Campo, was used for public games, such as jousting, and then later in the 16th century, for bull fights. When the Grand Duke of Tuscany outlawed bull fighting in the late 16th century, the areas of the city (contrade) took to organizing races, initially with buffalo or donkeys, which later developed into the present-day horse races around the Piazza del Campo.

During the build-up to the Palio, the seventeen different contrade, traditionally challenge each other to the the horse race, amid much distrust and rivalry.  Only ten horses are chosen, so the seven contrade which did not take part in the preceding Palio, are included in the next one, with the other three being chosen by draw.  Which horses will be chosen to race is based on advice by private horse dealers and owners, other Palio races in Italy, veterinary examination, and then a lottery to determine which horse will run for each contrada.  In such a competitive atmosphere, there are often accusations of cheating and bribery, and even doping.  Trial races are run, the first on the evening of the horse selection, and again on the morning before the Palio. The August Palio started out as an extension of the celebrations of the July Palio and was originally organized and funded by July’s winning contrada. After 1802, however, organisation and funding the August race became a central responsibility of the city, which removed annual uncertainty over whether or not an August Palio would run.

On the day of the Palio face, the city is buzzing with anticipation.  The event takes over the entire day, beginning with a mass for the jockeys in the chapel next to the Palazzo Comunale.  Then at 10.30 a.m. the names of the jockeys are confirmed, and given silk shirts in the colour of their contrada.  They cannot be substituted after this point. Next, at around 3 p.m. there is a large parade through the city, in historical costume, including drummers and flag throwers who demonstrate their arts using the colourful banners of their respective contrade. The parade reaches the Piazza del Campo between 5 – 7 p.m. with a firework signalling the arrival of the horses into piazza. As the jockeys come out, each one receives a whip which they can use to prod their own horse or that of their opponents in the race.

In the actual race, the jockeys ride bareback, circling the Piazza del Campo three times, which takes around 90 seconds. There is, inevitably, a quite a high level of danger involved, with the sharp bends around a dirt track, in a relatively small space, with riders often falling and the horse finishing on its own. The Palio in fact is won by the first horse to cross the finish line, whether or not there is still a jockey intact!

 Apartment still available for the August Palio!

Situated just around the corner from the Piazza del Campo, in the heart of the pedestrian zone, I Rozzi an absolutely charming, bright and elegantly appointed apartment on the second floor of a protected historic building dating from 1500. From the window in the living/dining room there are views over the Piazza del Campo to the medieval bell tower of the Palazzo Publicco opposite.

The apartment can be accessed by either a wide stone staircase or a lift. The rooms have parquet floors, exposed wood beamed ceilings and are comfortably and tastefully furnished throughout.